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, and they make fire suits, and after 9/11 when the pentagon was attacked and they needed fire companies to put out that fire, they had different companies come from the virginia area and the dc area, and they noticed that only the companies that were wearing the fire suits were able to work through the night and deal with the pathogens and extremities that were in the pentagon building. one of the people, the commander in the pentagon, called up rob freeze, who was the owner of globe fire suits said we need 300 fire suits here tomorrow. rob said, what's the sizes? i don't know, figure out how to get them here. rob freeze, the small company in new hampshire of about 300 people assembled fire suits, and rob was the only one allowed to take a mercy flight after 9/11, the only one allowed in the air space, delivered the fire suits, and the firefighters used them to put out the fire in the pentagon. it's a story about patriotism, but it's more than that. i wanted to know, well, what is it that allowed globe fire suits to still have comparative advantages, and one of the biggest insights for globe f
center. >> this happened to military families a stone's throw away from the pentagon. if it could happen here, it could happen any high where. >> reporter: this military wife and other of two doesn't want her face shown. cnn has also agreed not to show her children's faces or identify them by age. >> obviously, barbara, i am concerned about the privacy of my children. and then there's always the possibility of retaliation against my husband. >> reporter: it's every parent's nightmare. finding out her toddler was physically assaulted by child care workers at the ft. myer army day care center. the scandal grew to the point if the obama made an unprecedented phone call to army secretary john mac cue to express his concern. according to this fbi affidavit, this little boy and others were punched and slapped. one child was dragged across the floor. >> we thought, of all the different options, putting them in a child care facility during the day that was on a military base, that was pretty well-staffed, would be the safest, most secure environment for them. >> reporter: it all began back on se
. he does not have the experience to manage a very large organization like the pentagon. and we've actually had-- i think leon pa98 has done a wonderful job. i supported his nomination. he did have a lot of experience prior to coming here. and if there's a place we need great management, it's the pentagon, and a great manager. >> o'donnell: senators coburn and durbin, good luck today. >> thank you. >> o'donnell: a busy day this sunday. >> we actually had breakfast together. >> o'donnell: i think the american people wish you luck, too, with your gang of eight. we'll be right back. for an idea. a grand idea called america. the idea that if you work hard, if you have a dream, if you work with your neighbors... you can do most anything. this led to other ideas like liberty and rock 'n' roll. to free markets, free enterprise, and free refills. it put a man on the moon and a phone in your pocket. our country's gone through a lot over the centuries and a half. but this idea isn't fragile. when times get tough, it rallies us as one. every day, more people believe in the american idea an
of the news and i read a telegram from the pentagon that my unit would be deployed at a certain embarkation point along with the 80 second airborne, but the repeated patrol would stand and become part of the pentagon lower. along convoluted answer to your question but that was it. >> the fact that you selected your particular team and going on to work on disasters around the world after a time in vietnam with the u.s. military and the un, ever seen a situation where the u.n. commander gets to pick the right people so you did the campaign. >> i did. the first sergeant, you say i listened to my assignment, please select -- they knew more than i did about their own men and i had a whole battalion. we were able to get some pretty good people. generally they did their duty. nobody lost their cool. we had one or two close incidents thereafter in front of the cafeteria. i found out they hated the deputy marshals, civilians running around in blue suits, they had a regard for us because we wore a uniform. part of the tradition of the south, patriotism first. they didn't give us too much trouble but
about the pentagon. talk about federal workers. talk about obviously the unemploy unemployed whose benefits are going away. >> absolutely. the biggest -- the most dangerous thing, the fiscal cliff is the unemployment insurance. if we go over for a month we can sort of trick everything else. we can -- the irs can do some tricks to make it so you don't feel tax increases quickly. we can do tricks to make it so we don't lay off people at pentagon, we can furlough them. there's no trick with unemployment insurance. if we go over the cliff and don't do anything by unemployment insurance, 2 million people, hardest hit by the recession, will lose their unemployment insurance. that's number one. we're going to have the payroll tax cut expire, that's probably going to happen if we do reach a deal, that's one of the most important pieces of stimulative policy. the same said for refundable tax credits, helps poor folks. the same with the child tax credit. these have been really important for the working poor. you're going to see very, very big cuts to the government over time. we could paper
the wall street journal, or the pentagon indicated they wanted to maintain 6000 to 15th thousand u.s. troops following 2014. that is the issue under discussion now. there's approximately around 340 0,000 afghan security forces in place, including the police. the pentagon recently indicated i don't believe there was a major unit capable of operating independently from nato support. there was some manipulation of the metrics they were using where the things appear to be making more progress than perhaps they were. that came out in a white paper. what will be the long term success or failure of the afghan national security forces is yet to be determined. they need about $4.1 billion a year to continue at that level, which is more than the entire government revenues in afghanistan. so it's gone to take a long-term commitment of foreign powers to maintain that size of armed forces. the afghans have proven that they are excellent fighters. the question is will they be excellent soldiers for the government of afghanistan? host: one other question, how stable do you think the karzai govern
pentagon budget issues coming up. so there's some talk about him wanting to hang on and try to manage the budget issues that are going to hit the pentagon over the next few months. host: we're taking your calls with david jackson, the white house reporter for u.s.a. today. first up is doug from oklahoma on the democratic line. good morning. caller: good morning. i had a question about geithner. hadn't he said something earlier about wanting to leave? guest: that's correct. host: around the inauguration was the quote. host: how would you feel about geithner leaving? do you want him to go as a democrat? caller: that's a good question. no. no. guest: the caller is right. geithner has said publicly he wants to leave around the nomination. but with the uncertainty, i don't think the administration would want him to leave as long as these issues are hanging. so we get a fiscal cliff this deal and i think he's going to be gone by the end of the month but i think it's kind of up t in the air. host: says a contender for his job would be jack lew. guest: that's the betting money. is his job if
. they seem desperate to do that. plenty of liberals say, go over the cliff. big cuts in the pentagon and big tax hikes. the white house, from all indications that i've seen, they don't want that to happen. they are scared of what could happen to the markets. >> why aren't they dalg dealing with boehner? dana, be go ahead. jumpb in here. >> i think they won their negotiating power once boehner last week failed. as dana pushed out, the only thing that can get boehner is to do something. >> reporter: i think that you're right when i said that democrats don't think that the president will have much political damage. that does seem to be coming more from democrats here in congress than in the white house. democrats here in congress feel that it's a win-win for them politically. the one thing i will tell you very quickly, the pushback on this narrative that i heard from senate republican leader in the hallway. he said, do you remember who the speaker was during the hoover administration? i said, no. he said, that's my point. nobody will remember who the speaker was if ge into a recession but it's
and exchanges. >>> a bus bomb targeting. we are live from the pentagon with details. >>> his time has come again, a man from the '60s is getting a start again, lester chambers joins us back. >>> welcome back to "starting point." we've been talking about the blizzard and storm warnings from the deep south all the way to new england. we'll look at seymour, indiana, lexi sheen has drawn the short straw, she's from wlky and getting hammered. >> reporter: that's right, drew. things have calmed down. let me give you a look behind me. you can't see the tire tracks from where we came in 5:30 but the roadways are snow covered, two, two and a half inches have fallen since 4:00 this morning. we barely missed having a white christmas in seymour, indiana. indiana state police are advisi advising people to stay off the roads. they are urging everyone to stay home if it is at all possible and kind of a good day to do that. we were pointing out earlier this is the good snow, the stuff the kids like to play with, snowballs, snowmen, all of that good stuff but it is still dangerous. the roadway is slippery, slush
, the massive amount of spending cuts that will kick in at the beginning of the year to harm the pentagon and other agencies. if they are getting anything, there are low expectations but if they get anything it will be a very small deal, something much smaller than they have been talking about for weeks, jon. jon: there aren't too many people these meetings. so a little hard to get an assessment, what is your idea, what is your best, yeah, assessment i guess how things are between some of these leaders? >> reporter: they have gotten pretty tense the last couple of days as they have come back from the christmas holiday. we saw yesterday senate majority leader harry reid basically accusing john boehner of running a deck tate toreship, that was his word in the house of representatives. reid piled on a little bit late yesterday afternoon and senate republican leader mitch mcconnell responded. take a listen. >> speaker boehner should call members of the house back to washington today. he shouldn't have let them two in fact. they're not here. they're not here. john boehner seeps to care more ab
it would have especially hit the pentagon those have been delayed for at least two months. so it's something that they are going to have to tackle again. the other big problem what it does to the deficit more than 4 trillion of added debt that had a -- had many republicans voting against it. >> that is going to be huge debate over raising the nation's debt ceiling the president will push for an automatic increase in that. they will want to extract something in the way of spending cuts. we have been through this before. because republicans didn't get much of anything in spending cuts and the deal last night they will look for big ones in the debt ceiling negotiation. >> we hit the december ceiling november 21st but they put in emergency measures. what can you tell us about those measures? >> we know there are accounting gimmicks they can use to extend this. they can buy maybe a couple a month. they can negotiate the deal the president wanted to have some kind af debt ceiling raised as part of the agreement. this was kicked down the road. it is something in the way of spending cut
-to-know in the pentagon and cia and certainly the white house. so i just felt a personal responsibility to keep it close, but that meant that i was basically, you know, having to consult with myself, to be honest. >> keeping this secret also meant going on about the business of presidency, touring that awful storm damage in alabama while knowing at athat very moment u.s. navy s.e.a.l.s were already the on the move halfway around the world. you had to go to tuscaloosa? >> yes. >> you had to go have fun at the correspondents dinner? >> yes. >> seth meyers makes a joke about osama bin laden. >> did you know that every day from 4:00 to 5:00 he hosts a show on c-span? >> how do you keep an even keel, even when we look back on the videotape of that night, there's no real depiction there's something afoot? >> you know, when i go down to tuscaloosa, i'm very much present there, because the tragedy and the devastation that had happened to the folks there, i think, consumed all my attention. so that wasn't difficult to focus on. the correspondents dinner was a different story. you know, that a little bit of actin
'm an employee of the pentagon or some place which there are tens of thousands of employees, is there any possibility that any deal that that come up with is going to disproportionately affect a department like that or does that happen across the board? >> well, everything as it is right now is determined by the -- a law that was passed in 2011, the budget control act. that's what set in motion this trigger for sequestration. in that law, roughly half was supposed to go to the department of defense and half in nondefense agencies. but given that, they will be -- that's one of the things that there's uncertainty among federal employees also, because we don't know yet how much discretion agencies will have and how they implement their cuts. and, again, a lot of focus is on sequestration, those automatic cuts. but that law also put in place spending caps that will affect cuts that are even larger than the sequestration cuts. so cuts are definitely coming. that's not even a question. >> ifill: it's not debatable. >> it's just how large they will be and who will be impacted by those cuts. and
from the white house on this. here is former pentagon adviser michael rubin. >> thanks for having me, michelle. >> what should the white house do in response to this? >> ultimately, what with will have to be inspected and considered is the whole nature of the reset policy. if we trace the beginnings of this crisis back it actually started with the white house reaching out to vladimir putin to russia in supporting russia's accession to the world trade organization. the amendment which had govern the a lot of u.s.-russian/soviet relations going back to the 1970s had to be replaced. it was replaced in congress by the act which set russia's worst human viets violators there should be consequences when it comes to getting visas. vladimir mute indecided to lash out to the united states by pointing a figurative rifle at the head of russia's orphans. >> we improve russia's trade relation with us, officially and then he gets upset because buried within there is a little clause that says, as you point out, the worst human rights violators should have trouble getting into the united states. how
americans who served and sacrificed. this week the pentagon released the names of two service members killed in afghanistan. we also want to honor in sunday the man president george herbert walker bush called a true american patriot and one of the great military leaders of his generation, general norman schwartz cop who led u.s. forces in victory in the persian gulf war passed away this week at the age of 78. you can see our interview with norman swars cop from "this week" during the 1991 invasion from iraq on our website at when we return, how concerned are wall street and the world markets as we count down to the cliff? the answer when this special edition of "this week" returns. to the best vacation spot on earth. (all) the gulf! it doesn't matter which of our great states folks visit. mississippi, alabama, louisiana or florida, they're gonna love it. shaul, your alabama hospitality is incredible. thanks, karen. love your mississippi outdoors. i vote for your florida beaches, dawn. bill, this louisiana seafood is delicious. we're having such a great year on the gulf,
headquarters. this time the attacker is a woman. we have a live report from the pentagon. when you have diabetes... your doctor will say get smart about your weight. that's why there's glucerna hunger smart shakes. they have carb steady, with carbs that digest slowly to help minimize blood sugar spikes. [ male announcer ] glucerna hunger smart. a smart way to help manage hunger and diabetes. >>> car bomb exploded today outside a u.s. base in eastern afghanistan. a security guard and two truck drivers were killed and six civilians were wounded. the taliban carried out the attack which happened after a mini bus stopped at a security gate. it was the site of a 2009 attack that killed seven cia contract oregon and a jordian intelligence officials. >>> officials in afghanistan are learning more about a woman that shot and killed an american contractor. we want to bring in barbara starr at the pentagon. some of the things we hear about when you talk about insider jobs are the taliban dressed as women with the high jab and everything. we know this was a woman responsible for the attack. what h
about her identity. let's get that from barbara starr at the pentagon. hey, barbara. what are we learning about this woman and this attack? >> reporter: well, victor, all we know so far really is what the afghans are saying. there was a press conference with senior afghan ministry spokesman and he held up a very interesting passport, he says the passport of this woman and it is iranian, that she is an iranian citizen who came to afghanistan and married an afghan man. he also said she had some fake identity documents, but this is certainly raising the prospect that the shooter was iranian. so far, however, no indication yet she's tied to the taliban, that she is officially tied to iran at this point, or to any terrorist groups. by all accounts she came to kabul, police headquarters had a weapon hidden under her clothing, removed it, said she was looking for someone to shoot and walked out behind this u.s. contractor. he's now been identified as 49-year-old joseph griffin of mansfield, georgia, working for dime corp. international, a major u.s. firm working in afghanistan to help t
. the pentagon is making its tournament of roses debut honoring the veterans of the korean war. >> make sure you check out the rose parade on abc and the rose bowl. >> of course. >> and 2013 will begin with cold, cold weather in much of the country. they're saying the first week of january could be one of the coldest on record. >> what are we at, 35 last night in times square. kind of cold. it's been colder, but it's been warmer. >> it is bundle up weather, that's for sure. >> certainly bundle up weather. >>> meteorologist jim dicky here is now with more. >> good morning. and happy new year. unlike last winter, we've seen a pattern set up here where arctic air is surging in, and that will continue to do so the rest of the week. arctic air mass in place right now. the upper midwest morning temperatures below zero in minneapolis. minus four here. 14 in chicago. and this air headed towards the northeast. cold this morning in many cases. not as cold as we'll be tomorrow morning. 25 buffalo. syracuse, 13. into burlington. as the cold air filters in, many spots seeing wintry weather. snow showers regi
with the sequester? where are we on the pentagon cuts? >> nobody wants those pentagon cuts, including the president of the united states. there may be some on the left who would favor that. but that's not a dominant position. that's not where the political center of gravity is in the country. i think it's very likely that those sequester cuts are going to be turned off. now, remember the sequester, $1.2 trillion over the next nine years. that's a little over $100 billion a year. so half of that is defense, half of that is discretionary. the kick the can mini deal solution that we're talking about would identify some subset of spending cuts that would be the lowest hanging fruit still available that might turn off the sequester, or they could just turn off the trigger all together. the sequester exists because of a law passed by congress, another law passed by congress could change it. >> good to see you, john. thanks for the update. >> mastercard spending pulse saying it's the lowest level of 2008. high end is one of the areas getting hit hard. tom is managing director at the tellsee advisory group
over its price. but lockheed and the pentagon have come to terms to buy another round of the jets for nearly $4 billion. morgan stanley calls the f-35 the single most important investment debate over lockheed stock. second, cash will be king. as defense spending slows, analysts say many defense companies will reduce share buyback programs and conservative capital. and look to international customers to make up for lost business at home. third, it's a bird, it's a plane, it's big brother. as criticism rises over the use of drone strikes by the obama administration, look to see companies launching drone war at home for deals to build unmanned aircraft for domestic use. the faa says there could be 30,000 uavs in u.s. skies by 2020. the teal group says domestic drones could be worth $89 billion over ten years, as everyone from homeland security to tmz wants permission to use them. >>> let's get some more insight on the defense skprkt how to play it as the fiscal cliff deadline grows closer. howard rubel is with jeffries. great to speak with you. and i guess key to understanding the im
countries to rethink. >> a pentagon report this past summer found that iran's ballistic missiles were becoming more accurate, versatile and more deadly than ever. for years u.s. intelligence officials circled the year 2015. they believe by then iran could test an intercontinental ballistic missile with a range of 3500 miles. >> this gives them the ability it to attack a new european countries, which giving them a degree of political influence in a crisis they might not otherwise have. >> the latest intelligence report from congress was just released in the last few weeks. it reassesses that estimate and concludes iran is not likely to test an icbm in the nix years. >> we're joined by chris lawrence in washington. chris, first of all, why the change? why is that? >> well, suzanne, basically the report says that economic sanctions are making it harder and harder for iran to get the necessary components and materials. it also shows that the iranians are not getting the help they need from russia and china, whose support has be dropping over the past ten years. remember, there's a big dif
coalition troops, contractors have been killed in these incidents. >> barbara starr at the pentagon, thank you for that. >>> lisa sylvester is monitoring some of the other top stories in "the situation room." >> well, egypt's new upper house of parliament convened today. they will have legislative powers until a lower house is elected. signed in to what you, the controversial charter was approved in two weekend rounds of voting but turnout was just 32%. critics say the constitution excludes minority rights. >>> and the recovery in the housing mar are ket remains on pace. home prices up 4.3% in october over last year. that is the biggest percentage increase and n. more than two years. near record low mortgage rates and fewer foreclosures are pepping spur saleses which is boosting prices. >>> and the world's longest high speed rail line is up and running in china. the 1428 mile line spans more than half of the country linking the capital of beijing to the southern chinese boom city. trains will run at 186 miles an hour on average and china aims to have more than 74,000 miles of high speed ra
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)